Mentoring Relationships: a fruitful investment

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Almost every lawyer and roughly most law students are familiar with the good practice of mentoring, in which a student or an attorney gets together with a more senior lawyer who provides advice and keeps them from being led astray in the competitive race towards success. Mentoring programs can be found everywhere; they are widespread because they actually work: they help students, young attorneys, and further careers while bringing together networks and professionals.

As attorneys become more experienced and start gaining the necessary expertise in order for them to be a vital and crucial part in law firms, corporate offices, and other organizations, their needs also become more specialized and, to some extent, sophisticated. However, the fundamental need for direction and assistance in sailing rather complex atmospheres and environments within law corporations still remains; nonetheless, students, enthusiasts, attorneys and more senior attorneys can meet these needs by developing the aforementioned networks and relationships.

Suzzanne Uhland as previously talked about the importance of resorting to mentors from time to time; mentors are definitely people who can get to play a crucial role in people’s success as a professional. They build the pathways to connect the gaps between theory and reality of how the professional workplace operates. A mentor can also be an excellent partner; mentors can help others develop the skills they need so that they can thrive in their careers. An effective and fruitful mentoring relationship can serve as the bridge to access needed resources and people —key people—. Likewise, mentees can avoid mistakes and reduce the likelihood of falling victim of inexperience. Besides, they can save some time in their attempt to ascend to senior positions within law organizations.

Nevertheless, even though the benefits of resorting to a mentor have already been proven, and even though people have increasingly been looking for this type of relationships, yet many lawyers assert, or have asserted, that they either do not have a mentor or that they rarely resort to a mentor should they have questions.

Many attorneys, students, and law enthusiasts are completely disregarding the opportunity to take advantage of good mentors and productive mentoring relationships mostly because their expectations do not match their reality. Besides, they also let these opportunities go unnoticed because they have a totally biased, exaggerated connotation about the intrinsic role of a mentor —when the expectations are not met, they totally distort the entire concept. Such premise is what often leads to a fatal event commonly referred to as career suicide: almost every successful attorney could assert that his or her success could be accounted for by the presence of a fruitful and productive mentoring relationship. This is in fact particularly true for females in top positions of their professions who often face different junctures of isolation due to their, comparatively low, numbers.

There are other cases where a sheer array of professionals firmly believe that mentoring relationships and resorting to mentors for advice are not important; however, it is important to point out that this phenomenon obeys to a flawed preconception about the term “relationship”. It would be nonsensical and naive to actually believe that a mentor or a professional who seeks to help others through counseling is some sort of a fairy godparent. Mentors do not possess some sort of magic wand in order to provide mentees with their dream job or a successful career; nor can they interact with the mentee’s environment and get rid of all the challenges and the difficulties they have to face in the race for success. With that being said, a good mentor is rather like a good lecturer: he or she is able to provide valuable and crucial information, resources and, more importantly, a much deeper sense of perspective. Their job is not to provide mentees with all they need, but to teach them how to get it.

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Image courtesy of Unsplash at Pexels.com

Some lawyers also value the time factor. Allegedly, they do not have enough time for them to develop such relationship. They constantly complain about the lack of time in their lives, which is why they ignore additional commitments —or, like they say: distractions—. And even though this might indeed be, to some extent, true, what lies behind the incapability to make room in their schedule is rather a mistake in judgment and poor time management. Career success, unlike the common connotation, is all about working smarter and not harder nor longer. If the opportunity presents itself, take it. If there is a chance to develop a positive and productive mentoring relationship that may come in handy when sailing across the different nuances of the professional life, take it: do not let it go unnoticed.

Taking advantage of what a mentor has to offer is perhaps one of the greatest investments people can make for themselves.

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