5 Key Differences Between Mentoring and Coaching

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When we hear the word “mentoring”, we may relate it to some activities that we usually see in coaching events. However, mentoring and coaching are essentially different concepts that aim to have very different type of impacts on people, despite the fact that they often use the same type of approach and skills.

Since it may be hard to know when we are talking about mentoring or coaching, in this article, Suzzanne Uhland will talk about five key differences between mentoring and coaching that can help readers have a better understanding of both concepts and decide which one could work better for its company.

  1. Orientation

Mentoring focuses on relationships. This means that it aims to allow the mentee to know itself in order to help it feel safe within any given environment. Mentoring is oriented to specific goals related to personal skills and goals, such as having a more balanced life, building self- confidence, improving self- perception or understanding how the personal life can affect an individual in its working environment.

On the other hand, coaching focuses on the task. It is a great way for people to identify what they are lacking and work hard to improve it. This way coaching can help people become more efficient, thinking strategically, or giving more accurate information to others. In this sense, the coach’s job is to teach the coachee how to build up or improve a set of skills in order to take care of specific tasks in a better way.

  1. Short Term Vs. Long Term

Mentoring is understood as a long-term relationship between the mentor, the mentee and their context. It requires that all the involved parties can learn about each other because this will help them improve their environment and create bonds of trust between one another. To mentoring it is highly important for all the parties to feel safe, this is why building a good mentoring relationship can take up to a year to be built.

On the contrary, coaching cares about taking place for as long as it is needed. Usually, it is divided into a set of sessions that take place in a short period of time. The success of a coach is measured by its impact in a short period of time. It is important to keep in mind that everything depends on the kind of issue that is being addressed by the coach and the relationship between it and its coachee.

  1. Development Vs. Performance

Mentoring is interested in the individual’s development. This means that aims to have a deep impact on the way the person is structured. This impact should last for long period of time, affecting the future of the mentee in a positive way. This characteristic helps to improve the relationship between the manager and the employee who is being mentored because roles are defined in a better way and have a purpose in time.

Coaching, on the other side, aims to improve the coachee’s performance. This means that it is focused on the way things are being done today. Its main goal is to improve the individual’s current skills. When these skills are correctly improved, the coach’s job is over.

Related: What Can Mentoring Do For Me And My Career?

  1. Required Design

Mentoring is tailor-made. It requires the implementation of a design phase where a strategic purpose can be drawn. As it focuses on relationships, the used model may vary from one individual to another. Plus, not every mentor is meant to meet every mentee. Thanks to this, a matching process is also required.

As coaching about any matter can be conducted right away, it doesn’t require a design. This is why coaching events can take place anywhere at any time and include large groups of people at the same time. In a way, the only design coaching needs take place when identifying which area is going to be treated and the level of expertise that is needed in order to have the right tools to have an impact on the coachees.

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  1. Immediate Manager

Mentoring immediate manager is indirectly involved with the mentoring process. Most of the times the manager has little to do with the mentoring experience. It gives a freeway to the mentor so it can build a relationship with the mentee. However, when it is required, the manager may suggest some matches and give a few recommendations during the process.

The way coaching works require the manager to work hand-in-hand with the coachee. This happens because the manager is the one who is supposed to give both the coach and the coachee feedback on their results. This way, specific problems related to particular tasks can be addressed. The coach needs the manager’s input to know how the coaching process is evolving and the things that could be improved about it.

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