5 Key Differences Between Mentoring and Coaching

target_goal_task_skill
Image courtesy of freeimages9.com Free Images at Pexels.com

When we hear the word “mentoring”, we may relate it to some activities that we usually see in coaching events. However, mentoring and coaching are essentially different concepts that aim to have very different type of impacts on people, despite the fact that they often use the same type of approach and skills.

Since it may be hard to know when we are talking about mentoring or coaching, in this article, Suzzanne Uhland will talk about five key differences between mentoring and coaching that can help readers have a better understanding of both concepts and decide which one could work better for its company.

  1. Orientation

Mentoring focuses on relationships. This means that it aims to allow the mentee to know itself in order to help it feel safe within any given environment. Mentoring is oriented to specific goals related to personal skills and goals, such as having a more balanced life, building self- confidence, improving self- perception or understanding how the personal life can affect an individual in its working environment.

On the other hand, coaching focuses on the task. It is a great way for people to identify what they are lacking and work hard to improve it. This way coaching can help people become more efficient, thinking strategically, or giving more accurate information to others. In this sense, the coach’s job is to teach the coachee how to build up or improve a set of skills in order to take care of specific tasks in a better way.

  1. Short Term Vs. Long Term

Mentoring is understood as a long-term relationship between the mentor, the mentee and their context. It requires that all the involved parties can learn about each other because this will help them improve their environment and create bonds of trust between one another. To mentoring it is highly important for all the parties to feel safe, this is why building a good mentoring relationship can take up to a year to be built.

On the contrary, coaching cares about taking place for as long as it is needed. Usually, it is divided into a set of sessions that take place in a short period of time. The success of a coach is measured by its impact in a short period of time. It is important to keep in mind that everything depends on the kind of issue that is being addressed by the coach and the relationship between it and its coachee.

  1. Development Vs. Performance

Mentoring is interested in the individual’s development. This means that aims to have a deep impact on the way the person is structured. This impact should last for long period of time, affecting the future of the mentee in a positive way. This characteristic helps to improve the relationship between the manager and the employee who is being mentored because roles are defined in a better way and have a purpose in time.

Coaching, on the other side, aims to improve the coachee’s performance. This means that it is focused on the way things are being done today. Its main goal is to improve the individual’s current skills. When these skills are correctly improved, the coach’s job is over.

Related: What Can Mentoring Do For Me And My Career?

  1. Required Design

Mentoring is tailor-made. It requires the implementation of a design phase where a strategic purpose can be drawn. As it focuses on relationships, the used model may vary from one individual to another. Plus, not every mentor is meant to meet every mentee. Thanks to this, a matching process is also required.

As coaching about any matter can be conducted right away, it doesn’t require a design. This is why coaching events can take place anywhere at any time and include large groups of people at the same time. In a way, the only design coaching needs take place when identifying which area is going to be treated and the level of expertise that is needed in order to have the right tools to have an impact on the coachees.

GearUP Sessions_coaching
Image courtesy of Startup Mena at Flickr.com
  1. Immediate Manager

Mentoring immediate manager is indirectly involved with the mentoring process. Most of the times the manager has little to do with the mentoring experience. It gives a freeway to the mentor so it can build a relationship with the mentee. However, when it is required, the manager may suggest some matches and give a few recommendations during the process.

The way coaching works require the manager to work hand-in-hand with the coachee. This happens because the manager is the one who is supposed to give both the coach and the coachee feedback on their results. This way, specific problems related to particular tasks can be addressed. The coach needs the manager’s input to know how the coaching process is evolving and the things that could be improved about it.

What Can Mentoring Do For Me And My Career?

Mentoring just like teaching is an honorable endeavor in which someone decides to sacrifice some of his or her time to invest in the personal and professional development of another person. Mentoring programs can do wonders for a company not only by helping individuals become more competitive in the field and more prepared to undertake the challenges of the market but also by fostering an environment of wellness and loyalty towards the organization. Here at Suzzanne Uhland’s blog, we have talked before about the importance of mentors for career development and how they can impact many aspects beyond the company’s competitiveness and employee morale.

Partners_ Reception_business_team_mentoring_leadership
Image courtesy of ELSA International at Flickr.com

A good mentor is a person who is willing to share their time, knowledge, expertise and overall skills. They can help you find some perspective and find an angle that can give you a more positive outlook in life. Mentors truly care about the success of their mentees and know what they are talking about when they share their advice.

One of the most crucial aspects of a great mentor is the fact that even as they can be a great leader and help you achieve more with their guidance, they understand that they are not a finished product themselves. Mentors who are truly remarkable are people who are constantly growing and becoming better at everything they do. They are curious, inquisitive and do not settle for staying inside their comfort zone. Perhaps this is why we always talk about your responsibility as a mentee and what you can do to reciprocate inside the relationship.

Sometimes the most challenging part of mentorship is to actually understand its advantages and seek the relationship as something that you accept as a beneficial career move. Many times people are unable to identify the necessity and advantages mentoring can bring to them and overlook this amazing opportunity and that is why today we want to explore a little bit into what mentoring can do for you.

One of the most valuable aspects of mentoring is its ability to allow you to look at yourself in the mirror. What we mean by that is the fact that mentoring allows you to actually examine your weaknesses just as much as your own strengths. Your mentor is a great source of feedback that can help you identify things that you didn’t even know about yourself. This aspect can sometimes work as a double edge sword as it is the case with some people who believe they want to honestly examine themselves but are sometimes unable to deal with the repercussions. Maturity and willingness to accept well-intentioned critique is absolutely necessary to make the most out of this part of mentoring.

Another very important aspect of mentoring and probably the one that draws the largest amount of people towards these relationships is the search for knowledge. It is obvious that you do not know everything, as nobody does, but mentors are individuals with vast knowledge and experience that are willing to take their time to share it with you. Getting involved with mentoring and being open to acquiring new knowledge is the right attitude to have towards your own development. Remember that this is not a one-way street and just as you are learning from your mentor, you can teach them things you know better than they do. Mentoring is a very enriching experience when it comes to sharing knowledge and exchanging ideas and skillsets.

The leadership skills you can pick up from a mentor are sometimes the best lessons you can receive without even thinking about it. Your mentor is a person that will teach you things, even while they are teaching because their example is one of the most valuable knowledge they can pass down.

In order to take advantage of the relationship, you must be vigilant and observe the way they do things and their reasoning behind the decisions they make. Think about it, they are people who have been successful in your same field and individuals you most likely look up to. Professional growth is just one part of the package and you must also grow as a person to further develop your career.

partner_mentorship_mentoring-skills
Image courtesy of jimpg2_2015 at Flickr.com

Last but not least, a mentor is a great refuge where you can be completely honest and talk about the things that you do not understand or bother you without fear of the consequences of your candor. A mentor can give you a unique point of view from their leadership role and perhaps help you understand why some decisions are made at their level that you may not share or disagree with; all of this without risking upsetting your supervisors with your questions or your own discomfort with the situation. Mentoring is a great way to put yourself in the shoes of a leader and know what it takes to make the hard choices so you can be prepared for when the time comes in which you have to make those choices yourself.

Some good tips to manage a mentoring relationship

We have already seen many definitions for mentoring and we have seen many types of programs and approaches to mentoring. We don’t have to go again at those definitions. Instead, this time we will focus on the relationship mentee and mentors have and how this relation can be managed.

It is not only about a contract or having some kind of agreement but also about understanding the goals and the objectives that the mentors have for their mentees and what mentees expect from their mentors.

Suzzanne Uhland has compiled some very useful tips that give the readers some pointers on what are the terms that every mentoring relationship should have so mentors, mentees, and companies that use such programs understand and get the most out of their programs.  

mentoring_ideas_working
Image courtesy of Pixabay at Pexels.com

The first meeting

This is comparable to the first impression and the saying “there is only one chance to make a first impression”. Here the mentor and the mentee should meet each other and be very open about all the topics and about their own backgrounds and experiences. The idea with this first encounter is to know each other and to build that much-needed trust that will be the keystone for everything during the mentoring relationship. Some of the topics that are recommended to be discussed by mentor and mentee are the objectives and expectations of the relationship; what will the responsibilities be and what will the time commitments be; a place and schedule for the meetings; how confidential information will be treated and what will the limits be to conversations and topics;  which obstacles could arise and how to deal with them; and the terms to end the relationship.

The objectives and expectations of the relationship

Here the mentee´s goals are of most importance. The mentor should treat this information with a lot of commitment because here is where he or she can understand where the relationship will go. The goals should be specific, attainable and measurable. Going down to reality, the mentees sometimes don’t know where they are going exactly or have goals that are either too crazy or too short. Here the mentor can push the mentee to get out of his or her comfort zone and make the mentee think outside of the box and look for bigger and more ambitious goals. After this, the mentor should take a good look and see if he or she can really help the mentee on reaching such goals. This will prevent one of the most common reasons that mentoring programs fail which is a mismatch of mentor and mentee. Then, if there is a match, the mentor and mentee should discuss how these goals are going to be met.

A topic that mentors should avoid is talking about how expectations could fail or how their personalities could clash in the future of the relationship.  If there is chemistry the relationship should start and make changes as they go because if there is empathy on both sides any problem can be solved and learned from.

The limits

It may sound similar to a couple who negotiates times and hours for their own space, but it is absolutely necessary. The goals and objectives should be set and the boundaries for them should be discussed as well. Mentor and mentee have to be very clear on what limits would the relationship have because often people become too friendly or they use more time for the relationship than it is expected affecting other activities for the mentor or the mentee. Other problem that could arise are the questions on how to handle a difficult member of the board or the company; concerns about the strategic approach that the company has; and personal issues that are not the mentor´s job to handle. In many firms, a different mentor that has nothing to do with the mentee or is not within his group is assigned to the mentee in order to deal with personal issues and to not lose the ability to have a full and open disclosure.  Some of the common limits that firms set for a mentor – mentee relationship are: that the mentor gets involved in issues that require dispute resolution; using the relationship for direct career advancement, and talking about money or having an economic relationship.

Confidentiality and conflicts

folder_confidential_mentoring
Image courtesy of michael_swan at Flickr.com

This stage is delicate and should be managed correctly by the mentor. Of course, a lot of information that is confidential will come up in the conversations but there has to be an agreement on which is useful for the relationship and which information is just part of the conversation itself and not part of the program. If the lawyers are from different firms, for example, they should know and understand the Rules of Professional Conduct and abide by them.

Be sure to also read this post about the advantages of mentoring in the law profession.

* Featured Image courtesy of Pixabay at Pexels.com

Great Ways For Improving Your Mentoring Skills

Effective mentoring is an art, a science, a set of skills and a matter of constantly working on it to become better each day. The first step to becoming and a great mentor and remaining so, is to accept and understand that the mentoring process is a journey and not simply a patch that works every time and that is equally effective in all situations. Proper mentoring is about adapting and constantly adjusting to different surroundings, various people and the never-ending business landscape that changes at a pace that is usually set by your particular line of work and the external factors that are constantly forcing that environment to evolve. Being a great mentor means understanding change and adjusting accordingly, while at the same time being able to identify how your experience best translates to the new challenges placed upon young professionals today and how you are also affected by that evolution and the need to remain relevant as well.

partner_mentorship_mentoring-skills
Image courtesy of jimpg2_2015 at Flickr.com

Here in Suzzanne Uhland’s Blog, we try to provide you with the best mentoring advice that includes not only the basis on how to form this great relationship, but also help you find ways to improve your mentoring skills constantly and avoid remaining stagnant in such a fast moving environment.

Let us take a look at some of the best ways you can improve your mentoring skills and continue to exercise techniques that will allow you to always be ready to provide the best possible advice for those whom you take under your wing.

Always evaluate your own attitude towards mentoring.

Mentoring is definitely not for everyone. Leading a mentoring relationship is about the experience but more than anything is about attitude. Do you have the right attitude to mentor? Perhaps in this moment you do, but what about tomorrow? It is easy to fall in the routine and let mentoring become something that you will end up doing in autopilot, but is that the best you can give to those who look up to you for direction?

Being a mentor is about sacrifice and patience, and that means that it may take a toll on you with the passing of time. A responsible mentor always surveys their inner self to see if they are up to the challenge before getting involved in a mentoring relationship because they understand that their attitude is one of the most important aspects that determines the outcome of the partnership. Know your limits and be fair with your mentees.

Choose your mentees wisely.

Understand that while almost everyone can benefit from having a mentor, no mentor is right for every single situation. Choosing your mentees carefully will not only benefit them to get the most out of the partnership but it will also help you greatly to be benefited as well. Remember mentoring is a two-way street and a mutually beneficial mentorship is the best type of relationship you can have. In the end, you will both be grateful that your choice was deliberate and consciously made.

Understand the importance of the mentoring contract.  

It is up to both of you how formal your mentoring contract ends up being, however, there are some important points that every mentoring contract should be absolutely clear about. Experience is something you will only receive with due time, however, the use of tools and the understanding of their importance like in the case of the mentoring contract, is something that will go a long way on improving your own mentoring skills. The mentoring contract has to be specific about how long you two will work together. Very seldom you can give this contract a specific amount of time, as it is easier and more beneficial to decide the length of the relationship based on the goals that you wish to achieve. Identifying and agreeing upon those goals is where your experience becomes so useful. Sometimes mentees are not even sure how they can measure their own success and how they can judge that they are advancing or not, towards the goals they have set for themselves. It is your duty as the mentor to motivate them and help them see their own advancement in times when they become discouraged.

respect_mentoring
Image courtesy of Patrick Marioné at Flickr.com

Be committed to the relationship and expect that same level of commitment back.

Always be respectful of your meetings and the time you set aside for each other. Sometimes it becomes very easy to cancel meetings or postpone them for later dates. This can become a problem as it can turn into a habit and quickly damage the relationship while possibly losing all that has been accomplished so far. Avoid multitasking and instead, try to respect your time together as something sacred for both of you. These will instill discipline not only on your mentee but on you as well, something that will definitely help you greatly in your path of becoming a better mentor. Each person that you help will teach you lessons and add more tools to your arsenal so you can be prepared even better for the next challenge.

Great Ways A Mentor Can Boost Your Professional Life

A mentor is a person you choose to trust based on their experience, wisdom and willingness to help you in the enhancement of your personal and professional life. A mentor is someone who has lived some of the things you are going through and helps you make the most out of the situation by helping you recognize what you are doing right, what you have to adjust and how to best utilize your resources to receive the best possible yield out of your efforts. Mentors are a source of positive energy and attitude, as their outlook on life is always positive and they always help you look at the bright side of a situation and turn difficulties in learning opportunities by giving you direct and helpful feedback. Something else worth mentioning is that a mentor is always curious and inquisitive because they understand that they are not finished products either and that a constant search for self-improvement is a great example and a valuable lesson to teach those that follow them.

pexels-photo-60230_mentor_mentoring
Image courtesy of Tim Gouw at Pexels.com

Here in Suzzanne Uhland’s Blog, we have talked about ways to become a mentor and even the way mentoring is being portrayed in the media lately. Today, we want to analyze the specific ways a mentor can help you boost your professional life and aid you on the pursuit of a more fulfilling and successful career.

One of the greatest things a mentor can do for you is to help you be objective about your shortcomings, weaknesses, and mistakes. It is very easy to identify these things on others, but quite difficult to see it within yourself due to your own perspective and personal attachment to your situation. A mentor works like a mirror that talks back to you and doesn’t simply commend you on your achievements, but also helps you identify areas that need improvement and attention. A mentor is always thinking about what is best for you and understands the importance of having an open and honest relationship with the mentee in order to help them achieve the very best version of themselves.

Providing feedback while helping identify areas that need improvement is just one of the many things a mentor can do for you. Just as important as this, is the search for knowledge by taking advantage of the mentor’s experience.

A mentor is a person who is more knowledgeable in the particular area of expertise by which he or she was chosen to lead, and therefore, that knowledge is to be transferred in many ways to their mentee. It is important to consider that mentors have also made mistakes and gone through a lot of learning before they could find themselves in the position of being a mentor to others. That experience and the way they have reacted to those mistakes is one of the most valuable lessons a mentor can share with their mentees because those hurdles are probably common to that particular profession or line of work.

Another aspect that sometimes gets overlooked when it comes to the mentor and mentee relationship as well as the process as a whole, is the fact that a safe zone is provided for the mentees to decompress from their work environment and to talk about issues they may not be able to discuss with anyone else at work. It is no secret that work environment may be competitive and stressful environment and having a person available to talk to, to bounce ideas against and to turn to when searching for a fresh perspective can be extremely helpful. Some situations may be very sensitive to discuss with your boss or your co-workers, so turning to an outside perspective for advice is a great way to find possible solutions and to do so without risking possible negative consequences that may come from this.

professional_mentor_mentoring
Image courtesy of Andrew Pearson at Flickr.com

A good mentor is also a positive role model. This qualification applies not only when it comes to the professional aspect of the individual, but also in the way they behave in general. Mentors are respected by the mentees and they look up to them in more ways than one. It is important for the mentor to not only upkeep that image but also find ways to create situations in which they can impart knowledge by allowing the mentee to develop specific skills and qualities that may help them emulate the way their mentors would handle a specific situation.

A mentor always has a plan, but better yet, helps the mentee create a plan together. These plans include short-term goals and long-terms goals as well.

Short-term goals are ways to focus your immediate attention on aspects that need attention right away. A short-term goal projects results to be expected quickly and clearly evident in the life of the mentee. Short-term goals are highly motivational because they help you see that the influence of the mentor is yielding results.

Long-term goals usually fix attention upon the future, the growth of the professional life of the mentee and the way future projects should be directed to make a true lasting change upon their development.